The Rotten ‘Tater Cup, or (maybe) why your shoulder hurts

rotator cuff

Shoulder pain is frequently diagnosed as ‘rotator cuff syndrome’. I’ve heard patients call it ‘rotor cup’ or ‘rotating cuff’. What is this mysterious ‘rotator cuff’ anyway?
The human shoulder is an extremely mobile joint and the boney parts of the shoulder don’t hold it together at all because the cup part of the shoulder blade is very shallow. Conventional thinking goes that the shoulder joint is held together by the 4 ‘rotator cuff’ muscles (shown here), and that a tear in one or more of this set of muscles creates shoulder pain.

People with shoulder pain may also get told that they have tendonitis or bursitis, thoracic outlet syndrome, bone spurs or arthritis. Over the years of using Mechanical Link, I’ve found that most of the time, what the X-rays or MRIs show is irrelevant, and the doctor’s guess is just a guess. I treat some other part of the body, as determined by manual testing and palpation and the shoulder problem improves and eventually goes away, long-term. It’s different for each patient – on one young woman from Eastern Europe, it was the pull of the skin from her large vaccination scar. On a middle-aged man who still hadn’t regained shoulder mobility after surgery and two months of physical therapy, it was the injury sustained when he got punched in the nose in high school.

It’s a sunny spring day in April, and the African violets by my window are delighting in the light. “What can I do for you today?”, I ask Jim. The big, balding man with a broad open face sitting by my desk is a successful businessman. He’s told me before that I changed his life; that before he came to me, his shoulder hurt so much that he was miserable, irritable and hard to be around. The friends, family and co-workers that Jim has sent to me since then confirm this about him, and are grateful that he’s a different person these days.

“My shoulder is killing me”, he says, moving his arm to show me how he can’t lift it over his head. “I need to get back to playing golf; I haven’t done anything all winter.” “How long was it good for after last time?” I ask him. “Oh, I don’t know. About two months. And then, it’s right back to hurting.”

“Okay, let’s see what we find.” He’s had ten treatments over the last two years and a half and so, in my testing today I don’t find many restrictions. I check his chart. “You know, Jim, you last came to see me in November. But the time before that was December. How were you during the summer?”

“Oh! Really?! Wow, the time goes so fast! Well, I was fine, no problem. Huh. I guess I’ve done a lot better than I thought”.

Finally, I do find the primary restriction in his face. To be more precise, in his left eye socket. There’s an interesting bone named the ethmoid. It forms the upper part of the nasal septum (divides the halves of the nose), the inner wall of the eye socket, and also part of the ‘floor’ that the frontal cortex of the brain rests on. Like everywhere else in the body, there is also fascial tissue here. It’s the packing material, connecting, fibrous stuff that holds us all together.

Jim is lying on the table. “Okay, show me how your shoulder moves.” He lifts his arm painfully and can’t get it even parallel with his nose. Then, I release the fascia around the ethmoid where it’s stuck – reaching delicately but deeply into the nose side of his left eye with thumb and forefinger. The release is quick – and so light as to be almost nothing. Often, people don’t even feel it.

“Try moving your shoulder again.” As the arm moves halfway to Jim’s ear, he rolls his eyes and suppressed grins appear on both our faces.

“When they’re tying me to the stake and lighting the faggots, you’ll come and rescue me, right?”, I ask.

“Absolutely.”

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Where are Memories Stored?

Frances (we’ll call her), age 58, came for help with foot pain. She also had some back pain and other, less pressing complaints. I asked her about significant injuries and scars. She said, “Well, I fell in the 3rd grade on a step and hurt my shin, it cut to the bone. But I really can’t talk about it. I’m just funny like that.” Other than her foot pain, her health was good, with no significant problems. She spent her time taking care of infirm and elderly family members.

As you know, during a ML session, I am investigating the body to find the primary lesion; the structure where all the body’s restrictions begin. No matter what I tested, her shin with the scar was “talking louder.” I identified her tibia bone as the primary lesion, and treated it using a technique for a bone bruise, which involves simply holding the affected bone and paying attention to its erratic movement. It looks like “doing nothing,” but quickly, the sensation of movement in the bone will change and become more even and regular. Granted, perceiving this sensation takes a lot of practice and hyper-awareness to feel.

Frances returned 4 weeks later. When I asked about her foot, she said, “Well, my father died right after I was here, and I had to put my mother in a nursing home. There’s been a lot to do, and I’ve just been getting up every day and running around abusing my foot, and it doesn’t feel any worse. In fact, I don’t notice it quite as much, so it must be better!”

“The most amazing thing, the way I know you really did something, is that now I can talk about it. I’ve had it all these years, and whenever somebody asked my about the scar, I just couldn’t talk about it. My leg would twitch and flop around whenever I thought about it, and I couldn’t talk about it. We had a big family, and my father didn’t think it was necessary to go to the doctor, but it took three months to heal, and it was always very sensitive.”

“But after my session with you, I was able to go to my best friend’s house. She’s known me since 4th grade, and I said, ‘Let me tell you how I got this scar on my leg.’ And I told her all about it. I can talk about it just fine now.”

How can scientist, who ought to know better, believe that emotions and thought are confined strictly to the brain? This is a beautiful example. Frances’ painful emotions of the event; of being the center of the attention of horrified adults, the nonchalant attitude of her father to this painful injury, and the physical trauma were clearly stored in the bone. They were so entrenched that she couldn’t even verbally express the experience. In fact, her body’s physical aversion to recalling those memories actually protested with distracting movements. Releasing the trauma held in the bone (for 50 years!) removed the trauma of the experience.

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Possibly more than you ever wanted to know about me.

Before a session

Before a session

1045am

25 minutes later, after the session. No  spinal manipulation; the body changed itself.

This is an article by Dan Lounsbury, not me, that was published in the March 2016 edition of Buena Vista Life, a Winston-Salem neighborhood magazine. Reprinted with permission. I think Dan did a great job!

“Nancy Crooks has a yellow post-it note on her desk with these words written on it: Resist the temptation to understand this from your point of view. She attributes the quote to Dr. Jade Teta, medically trained Naturopathic Doctor, friend, associate, and co-author of The Metabolic Effect Diet. Those words apply dramatically to Nancy’s work. Heeding that advice could be one of the best decisions a person ever makes, particularly when it comes to understanding the sciences related to personal well-being.

Medical science is dynamic. Each generation, and multiple times within each generation, new discoveries and understandings take place, altering public perception and inspiring action that sometimes change our lives for the better, but sometimes not. Much has been learned and is still being learned about how the body functions and about the mind-body connection. Lesser known and less talked about is the body’s ability to communicate within itself, one area and one part to another. That’s where Nancy Crooks’s interest and expertise lie. And there are many who are thankful for that.

A native of the Finger Lakes region of New York, Nancy was graduated from Alfred University where she found that she enjoyed working with her hands above all else. Following college she moved to Edinburgh, Scotland where she met and married her husband, Allin Cottrell. “We play old-time music together; he’s the best guitar player in the world, and I play the fiddle. Mostly in our living room, although we have been known to play for dances. I love to read; non-fiction, biography, history, popular science, and good fiction. I’m one of those weird people who loves to hear about your operations, and have a serious interest in anatomy–people-watching, and cadaver dissecting (an expensive hobby, only in labs).

“We came to North Carolina in 1983,” said Nancy. “Allin is an economics professor at Wake Forest now and taught at UNC-CH. When we got to Chapel Hill, the first massage therapy training programs were opening. I passed up the first opportunity but took it the next year. Right away, I was in heaven. It was immediately gratifying, but still, people kept returning with the same problems, and although massage was gratifying, it wasn’t satisfying. So, I kept looking for manual techniques that gave longer lasting results. I took a lot of different courses and traveled quite a bit to learn more. While I was in Oregon with a physical therapist there, he told me about Mechanical Link. He described it as, ‘You spend a lot of time examining the patient, do a couple of little flicks, and they get better.’”

Mechanical Link, a healing technique centered in osteopathy, is taught and practiced predominantly in Europe. It was not, and is not, widely known in the United States, for reasons related to culture, understanding, and sadly, politics. –Resist the temptation to understand this from your point of view. — Mechanical Link relies on the oft-ignored intelligence of the body to communicate with itself.

Nancy dove into the education and practice of Mechanical Link and after over 10 years has never looked back. “Mechanical Link is a hands-on treatment that is very, very gentle, yet extremely potent,” Nancy explains. “The potency lies in the accuracy of the practitioner in finding the primary restriction that’s preventing the body from healing itself. To do that, we have to examine all the structures, using the hands. It’s very low-tech (no machinery) but that doesn’t mean it’s not sophisticated or scientific.”

One of only a handful of Americans trained and practicing, Nancy’s patients travel to Winston-Salem from many parts of the United States for treatment. Sought out by the Ukrainian Osteopathic Association last year, Nancy taught Advanced Palpatory Skills in Kiev, providing her added perspective. “They grasped and embraced the practice quickly. They don’t have the same restrictions and limitations about treatments that aren’t insurance driven like we do. Here it’s often a treatment of last resort, after people have tried all kinds of medical, orthopedic and ‘alternative’ therapies. Over 90% of patients report lasting changes within three sessions. We’re able to improve conditions that other therapies can’t touch.”

Nancy’s passion for helping others overlaps with her professional expertise. “When I saw how scars, whether they healed well or not, impacted people’s function, I wanted to help more people with scars. I’ve been volunteering at Cancer Services, doing Scar Therapy for about four years. It’s the same thing I do in my office, but I call it Scar Therapy because most cancer patients have scars, and nobody would come if I called it Mechanical Link. The results we get are very consistently good, and long-lasting, without deleterious side effects. I don’t know of treatments for injury, chronic pain, migraines and joint pain that can say that.”

Success stories are numerous. A patient, complaining of hip pain, for example, visited Nancy and reported, “It took about an hour. She gently touched my joints and soft tissues, made a few notes and then did this little flicking movement on certain areas. I was skeptical, didn’t see how what she did could make a difference, but it did. The hip pain disappeared, but what really got my attention was that about a week after my treatment I noticed that a TMJ issue I’d had for years, but had not mentioned to Nancy, was gone. My jaw had clicked and popped when I chewed, but no more. Almost two years have passed and there is still no sign of the hip or TMJ problem.”

How does she do it? “The tissue tells me. The body has more intelligence than we do intellectually. Trust your body; it’s taking care of you, keeping you alive, but sometimes, it needs a little help to feel and function better. We give our greatest gift to the world when we are fully expressing ourselves. It inspires others to do the same, though you might never know that. I was very lucky to find a perfect and beneficial way to express myself, and have the freedom to pursue it.””

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Phobias, Body Memory and Mechanical Link

V, a 62 year old woman who had been diagnosed with Fibromyalgia/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome came to see me. She had had lifelong, almost daily headaches that came and went but sometimes were so severe that she had to go to bed. In her early 20s, she had had Epstein-Barr which caused mononucleosis, an infectious disease characterized by extreme fatigue that can last weeks or months.

Despite that, she had been fairly active most of her life and used to walk 2- 3 miles two or three days a week. Then, one summer day two years earlier, she woke up in such severe pain that she couldn’t get out of bed. She had many tests from many different doctors to rule out any pathology; including a cardiologist for the chest pain, a gastroenterologist (hiatal hernia and reflux), and an allergy specialist.

After about a year of medical merry-go-round, Victoria took herself to a doctor who practiced integrative medicine. The doctor prescribed hormone replacement therapy, supplements, and counseling. It was the counselor who referred her to me.

Incidentally, in our first conversation she said that she had to be careful about what she wore, because certain tops just felt oppressive around her throat, and made her feel she was choking. This was an important clue that I didn’t pick up on right away.

A month after her first Mechanical Link treatment, she reported that her throat pain and neck/head/facial pain went immediately and stayed gone for three weeks. Her general state of well-being was much improved, with more energy, better sleep and she was able to ‘get things done’. People were even remarking that she looked better.

At her third visit, her energy and sleep were still better. She reported dreaming, and being able to feel sleepy. There were other small improvements but she was concerned that she might be reacting to toxins in her home. She planned to move into a brand new house and change her diet to eliminate gluten.

At the end of her fifth treatment, she told me that she had had a traumatic birth. The family story was that she looked like ‘blue hamburger’ – the doctor had used forceps and the umbilical cord was wrapped around her neck. She had also contracted whooping cough as a small infant, before she could be immunized for it. I made a note to check for signs of this at the next visit.

At the sixth visit, V reported having experienced a slight rebound of earlier symptoms (funny taste in mouth, tingling fingers, joint pain) but was still feeling better overall. Digestive issues had improved with her dietary changes. Anxiety had decreased, and joint pain had diminished considerably. I carefully made my assessment, and then explored her cranium for signs of the forceps delivery. Nothing there. But when I put a hand on either side of her neck, and tested the motion of the skin, I found that the skin and underlying tissue was much tighter on the left side. This is what I treated, the torsion within the skin. Also the umbilical scar, site of laparoscopy for the hysterectomy and gall bladder surgery.

I saw V a few months later. She had been having financial challenges, partly because she was also paying for the food allergy testing that showed she was allergic to many common foods. She had been avoiding these foods and was largely feeling much better overall. The only pain she complained of was the right side of her neck and some ear pain on the right. What I found was the remains of the umbilical-cord-wrapped-around-the-neck in the skin under her jaw on the right, which was pulling on her ear.

About three months later, about 13 months after we began working together, I checked on V by phone. She told me that the right-sided jaw pain was gone. She was feeling much better and still working on improving her diet. Her phobias (fear of being on or in water, bridges, choking, drowning, suffocating) now made sense to her, and while they hadn’t disappeared entirely she found some comfort in knowing their basis. Throughout her entire life, the tension in the skin, and underlying structures in her neck (arteries, nerves, esophagus, muscles, trachea, etc. etc.) had affected her, but in subtle, pervasive ways that were only addressed with the Mechanical Link discovery and treatment.

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From the “Everything’s Connected” Department

95

“I know it in my bones.” “My gut was telling me to go for it.” “I threw my heart into the project.” Our language has been ahead of cognitive scientists for centuries – thinking does not come solely from the brain.

I’ve been seeing for years now that when the body changes through Mechanical Link, often the mind changes, too. Depressed people get happier, timid folks get more confident. What happens in and to the body, outside of the brain, affects how and what we think.

“Where is Thought?” from the June 2013 issue of Discover magazine, talks about just that. …”Thoughts aren’t confined to our brains – they course through a network that expands to our bodies…” and …thought itself is a system that simultaneously takes place in the brain, the body and the environment around us.” Those familiar with Mechanical Link know about this ‘network that expands to our bodies’, and it’s not nearly so surprising a concept as it is for the cognitive scientists.

The concept is not so surprising, but some of the effects are. For example, a person holding a gun is 30% more likely to interpret what someone else is holding as a gun. In another experiment, the subjects’ degree of fitness determined how steep a hill appeared to them.

The story below is a beautiful example of memory stored outside the brain.

Frances (we’ll call her), age 58, came for help with foot pain. She also had some back pain and other, less pressing complaints. I asked her about significant injuries and scars. She said, “Well, I fell in the 3rd grade on a step and hurt my shin, it cut to the bone. But I really can’t talk about it. I’m just funny like that.” Other than her foot pain, her health was good, with no significant problems. She spent her time taking care of infirm and elderly family members.

As you know, during a ML session, I am investigating the body to find the primary lesion; the structure where all the body’s restrictions begin. No matter what I tested, her shin with the scar was “talking louder.” I identified her tibia bone as the primary lesion, and treated it using a technique for a bone bruise, which involves simply holding the affected bone and paying attention to its erratic movement. It looks like “doing nothing,” but quickly, the sensation of movement in the bone will change and become more even and regular. Granted, perceiving this sensation takes a lot of practice and hyper-awareness to feel.

Frances returned 4 weeks later. When I asked about her foot, she said, “Well, my father died right after I was here, and I had to put my mother in a nursing home. There’s been a lot to do, and I’ve just been getting up every day and running around abusing my foot, and it doesn’t feel any worse. In fact, I don’t notice it quite as much, so it must be better!”

“The most amazing thing, the way I know you really did something, is that now I can talk about it. I’ve had it all these years, and whenever somebody asked my about the scar, I just couldn’t talk about it. My leg would twitch and flop around whenever I thought about it, and I couldn’t talk about it. We had a big family, and my father didn’t think it was necessary to go to the doctor, but it took three months to heal, and it was always very sensitive.”

“But after my session with you, I was able to go to my best friend’s house. She’s known me since 4th grade, and I said, ‘Let me tell you how I got this scar on my leg.’ And I told her all about it. I can talk about it just fine now.”

How can scientist, who ought to know better, believe that emotions and thought are confined strictly to the brain? This is a beautiful example. Frances’ painful emotions of the event; of being the center of the attention of horrified adults, the nonchalant attitude of her father to this painful injury, and the physical trauma were clearly stored in the bone. They were so entrenched that she couldn’t even verbally express the experience. In fact, her body’s physical aversion to recalling those memories actually protested with distracting movements. Releasing the trauma held in the bone (for 50 years!) removed the trauma of the experience.

 

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Why does it work?

Gretchen’s story raises many questions. We are accustomed to thinking that mental states reside in the brain. Of course, the whole body experiences a panic attack – adrenaline is released from the adrenal glands, elevating the heart rate and initiating the flight or flight response. But doesn’t it originate in the brain, perhaps with anxious thoughts? What does it mean for us, when the solution to her problem was to release the greater occiputal nerve? Granted, this nerve is near the brain. It is just at the base of the skull, is that close enough?

Of course, the body contributes to, and participates in the state of the brain. Fascia, or extra-cellular matrix, surrounds everything in the body, and affects it. The membranous covering of the brain and spinal cord, the membrane that separate the hemispheres of the brain, the pericardium that surrounds the heart, and indeed the layers of fascia through which blood vessels and nerves all over the body pass – these tissues are part of the whole cloth of the fascial system.

The Mechanical Link practitioner knows that what solved this particular problem in Gretchen’s case is not universal. Another person with the exact same set of symptoms or conditions – migraine, social anxiety, panic disorder, insomnia, etc. would likely have their primary lesion in quite a different structure. It can only be determined by an accurate assessment – we do not assume “Aha, this is the seat of panic attacks.”

Another question that arises is, How could this single treatment possibly be so effective? I was only attempting to soothe her for the moment, to get her out of crisis mode, so we could each begin our day. And yet, the results were profound, and long-lasting, whereas other, medical treatments like prescription drugs were only a stop-gap measure that didn’t even work very well.

The French osteopaths who develop Mechanical Link and continue to refine it often use it for people with addictions; those who want to stop smoking, for example. They say that the treatment will be more effective if the patient is in slight withdrawal, and thus will do a treatment after the patient has abstained from the drug at least 48 hours. The effects of withdrawal intensify the lesions, or restrictions in the fascial tissue, so the treatment will have a much larger impact. My supposition in Gretchen’s case is that the panic attack intensified all her lesions, and gave the treatment a much, much larger impact that solved many problems at once.

Even so, patients that I’ve treated in the clinic, who suffered from anxiety or panic attack but were not in the throes of it at the time, notice a beneficial effect. One man was able to visit his mountain cabin and spend a weekend for the first time in 18 months, which he had avoided before because of his anxiety. A friend in a stressful job situation that left her emotionally drained and exhausted reported feeling “strangely happy”, after a treatment.

By releasing the primary lesion, wherever it may be, the fascial system can re-balance itself, which also turns down the ‘volume’ or the excess input/signal to the nervous system. Think about the experience of wearing ill-fitting, pinching shoes and scratchy wool underwear at the same time. Such a wardrobe would put a lot of ‘static’ into your nervous system, distracting you from almost everything else. Getting a Mechanical Link treatment is like a bit like changing into soft, comfy clothes that fit you better and feel great. Then you can pay attention to things other than your discomfort.

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Panic Attack: Mechanical Link to the Rescue

As I was lying awake in the pre-dawn hours, wondering whether sleep would return, the phone rang. At that hour, it could only be a wrong number or a family emergency from another time zone. “What!?”, I barked into the phone. I heard a small voice. “Nance, could you come over?”

It was my neighbor, Gretchen. She has suffered a lifetime of migraines, anxiety disorder and panic attacks, which all escalated after a bitter divorce and an unrelated (and unrelenting) family tragedy. Even walking around the block triggered panic, and she avoided unfamiliar places and social situations. The EMS crews have been to her house so many times they know her by name. Several times, awakened by the sirens and flashing lights, I had peered out the window to see the firemen and EMTs stomping up to her house, milling around and then leaving. In the grip of a panic attack, it’s hard to be convinced that death is not immenent. Each time, after the truck and empty ambulance pulled away, Gretchen felt exhausted and foolish. Her body had tricked her again.

One day, I had said, “Why don’t you call me? I can do you as much good as they can.” By which I meant, just having someone sympathetic who will calm you down and convince you that you’re not dying will be as good or better.

I dressed quickly and went over to Gretchen’s. She was shaking so hard she could hardly stand, and felt nauseous. Her head felt like it was splitting, her heart was racing and she hurt all over, which wasn’t surprising as her body was in full flight mode, with all muscles tensed, ready to flee. I had never seen anyone in this state before.

I sat beside her, rubbing her back lightly and speaking calmly but what I really wanted to do was treat her. Gretchen agreed to lie on her back on the sofa, and I began to test her tissues gently. Without doing the full testing, I couldn’t be sure, but I found place between her head and neck that is frequently a primary lesion, and treated it with a flick of my thumbs. She said, “Oh, it always hurts there. That’s right where my headaches are.” I rechecked the previous tests; they were negative.

Gretchen’s breathing began to slow, and her shaking subsided. Her face started to relax, her color returned and she sat up. We visited a little bit more, and then it was time to get ready for work.

About two weeks later, we were walking together. “How’s your head?”, I asked. “I haven’t had any headaches”, she said. I smiled. “Did you do that?”, she asked. “Yes, I think so.” “I haven’t had any anxiety, either. Last week, I went to my grandson’s school for a program, and I made it through the whole thing, with all those people, and I didn’t even take a Xanax!” “And even without the Xanax, you were fine?” “Yes!!, my mom and my daughter were amazed.”

“How about your stomach?”, I asked, because I knew she had digestive problems.

“Well, you know, that’s better, too. Did you do that?”

“Yes, probably.”

“And you know what’s weird? I’ve been sleeping. On Sunday night, I was watching television around 8pm and the next thing I knew, I woke up on the couch still in my clothes, still sitting up at ten o’clock. That’s never happened before! And I went to bed and I slept all night. I’ve been sleeping MUCH better.”

“Now I just have to get rid of this auto-immune problem I’m having.”

I explained that when the body’s self-healing potential is freed using Mechanical Link, it then has more resources to use to fix itself. It was entirely possible that her auto-immune disorder would resolve, now that her body didn’t have to expend so much energy mounting defenses to be in flight mode continuously. And being able to sleep well, and be out of pain would all aid her in improving her health. Mechanical Link just makes life easier, so our bodies can function as they were meant to.

“Wow”, she said, “I need to get my mom to come see you.”

 

Name used with permission.

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Is it Placebo?

I have a scientist friend with a serious diagnosis. She is often in some amount of pain, as evidenced by her hand which grips her opposite shoulder much of the time. Things that she loves to do, she cannot do, at least not for as long or as often as she would like. I am certain I could help her, or that it would be at least worth a try. But I have given up offering.

One day we were sitting over tea. She questioned me about my work and how I did it, which led to the question that has been in her mind all along. “How much of what you do is placebo, do you think?” She likes to read studies, and is now on a powerful drug for her condition.

A meta-analysis shows that every single treatment available has a placebo effect, even surgery. Patients who had sham knee (incisions simply made in their knee, under anesthesia) surgery had just as good results as patients who actually had invasive ‘real’ surgery. Our belief in the effectiveness of the treatment, and our trust in the person or agent who delivers it is an extremely powerful part of our healing.

While on a visit to Russia, I was taken to visit the practice of a chiropractor. Chiropractic was considered very exotic at that time. His patients were lined up at his door, weeping with fear. They wanted the treatment, believed it could help them but they also knew, or had heard, that it was very painful. Even through their tears and their terror, they told me, “Oh, he’s a very good doctor. He’s cured my husband, my mother, my sister.”

Studies of placebo show that the more dramatic the treatment, the better the results. The witch doctor with the bigger show is more likely to help more patients.

For these reasons, Mechanical Link seems to have very little placebo effect. The actual moment of treatment is so light as to be frequently imperceptible to the patient. There is no ‘cracking’ of bones, no deep pressure or stretching sensations. There is absolutely no drama, only intense examination to discover the source of the problem. I’ve never met anyone who, with no experience of it, believed that a tiny flick with the finger could solve their back pain of forty years, back pain that has puzzled myriad experienced doctors and defied the probing of many imaging tests.

And yet, at least 4 out of 5 patients report back, a month later, that their complaint has improved. “My back pain is still there, but it’s much less.” “I have many more good days now.” “I am sleeping much better.” “My shoulder problem went away, and the constipation, which I didn’t tell you about, is also better.”

Placebos give instant relief, that may wear off. There is something else at work when we use Mechanical Link. How about actual improvement?

Mechanical Link – Painless Therapy, Visible Changes, Lasting Results.

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